As a parent, you have probably asked yourself why it is important to learn to code? Most schools in the modern world are trying to include these classes to help kids to gain basic code skills.

So, why it is important to everyone to have those skills? Having basic code skills will help the kids to understand how this process works because computers are everywhere today. Many of them will decide to choose this profession in the future and for the ones who don’t want to be programmers, there are many other opportunities to use these skills like SEO or Marketing.

Danny Yaroslavski from the Medium site has published an interesting article about the reasons why your kids need to learn to code.

3 Reasons Why Schools Are Teaching Your Kids to Code

On Dec 8–14, millions of students will be learning the basics of coding in school during the Hour of Code. The author is an Hour of Code tutorial partner.
When I was 12, I was following my interest in art and taking an animation class outside of school. One day, my instructor showed me that I could add a line of code to a button so that viewers could replay my animation. After tweaking the same line of code, I could have viewers use the arrow keys instead. Toying and refining the code some more, I became the proud owner of an avoid-the-falling-objects game. ‘Wow’, I thought, ‘now that’s cool!’
This was an eye-opener for me, and it’s the exact kind of experience that the Hour of Code is trying to instill in youth.
It‘s an experience that shows kids that they can make a computer do a countless number of things, limited only by their imagination.
So why is specifically coding being taught? Why not focus more on teaching math, reading, or any other subject? If your child is not planning on becoming a programmer, why learn this at all? Read the full artcile here.

We hope that you understand why it is important to teach children to code. Here is another interesting article which has been written by Jon Ellis from TutorHub and which gives the tips for parents about this subject.

Tips for parents: Teaching your children how to code

As someone who works in the digital industry, I come across coding every day in many ways. It’s the building blocks of websites and applications, the things that touch us every day.

In countries like Estonia, children have been learning coding as part of their national curriculum for several years. In the UK we have made significant progress in introducing and promoting the importance of coding, including The Year of Code Campaign, which comprises a series of events throughout the year 2014 aimed at teaching children how to code.

As of September 2014, a brand new computing curriculum will be taught in all schools, which will focus on teaching kids to code, design programmes and understand the inner workings of a computer. This is in stark contrast to the old ICT programme, which focussed on computer literacy.

UK Engineering Director at Google, Mike Warriner, told the press: “The UK has a proud computing history but with more and more industries wanting computer scientists, coding has never been in more demand. It’s great that teachers will be trained with the skills they need to teach children from a young age and hopefully inspire the next generation of developers and programmers”.

The aim is for Britain to spearhead new technological developments, and to be the ideal setting for the launch of new companies in the technological sector. Read the full artcile here.


In the video above you can watch what the most famous people in the IT world said to us and their opinions about why our kids must learn to code. If your kid has gained some coding skill, that is good but if your kid actually likes this, that is even better because this occupation will be very paid in the future. Your rule, in this case, is to provide them perfect working conditions. Except for good computer and good monitor you should also consider getting a good quality desk for you kids. Just check versadesk review to see if this fits you or choose another one. Those are adjustable-height standing desks where your kids can choose between standing or sitting while learning.